Mindful Weekend: Practice with your Partner

 

This weekend, do your practice with your partner
This weekend, try practicing mindfulness with your partner

How does your partner feel about your mindfulness practice? Whether they are enthusiastic participants themselves or reluctant skeptics, why not invite them to practice with you this weekend? To start, just take 15 minutes to do a body scan together. I recommend this video as a guide. A body scan is typically an excellent exercise for those new to the concept of formal mindfulness practice.  Once you’re comfortable with meditating together, you may want to try a seated practice back-to-back with one another.  Or, even holding hands during practice and using the sensations of touch as anchors to the present moment.

Doing a formal mindfulness practice together could result in a feeling of closeness and intimacy, or perhaps a moment of shared shyness resulting from doing something novel together. When you’re finished, you can ask your partner what their experience was like, what they noticed in their body. And make sure to share your own experience- including all the difficulties (e.g., boredom, judgment, feeling self-conscious) inherent to practice.

And why? Among many reasons, research indicates that regular practice of mindfulness increases activity in the anterior insula of the brain. This is the region of the brain that helps our bodies make sense of all of the sensory information present in a given moment. So, what that amounts to is that more activity in this region is linked to intensified pleasure, sensation and physical attunement during sex! What other reason do you and your partner need? Now go get busy… meditating!

Wishing you a happy and mindful weekend.

(Image courtesy of arztsamui / FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

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Mindful Relationships: Rewiring for Compassion and Effective Communication

Being mindful can jumpstart your relationship
Being mindful can jumpstart your relationship

I don’t know about you, but my partner really can push my buttons. Sometimes he does so intentionally but oftentimes it happens without him knowing it.  In either case, when my buttons get pushed, I typically react in anger. Or, my fallback: passive aggression. As you can imagine, this can lead to the formation of some pretty unhelpful patterns in our relationship.  Usually it results in him getting defensive and me feeling hurt.

When we choose our partner, we usually do so with the assumption that our partner will help to support us in all avenues of life. I think most relationships start with both people oriented toward this ideal: that the relationship is good and that they want to do what is reasonable to keep the relationship on this positive track. But almost always, wires get crossed along the way. And we develop patterns of reacting in our relationships that result in undesirable and distressing experiences.

Bringing more mindfulness to relationships can provide a jumpstart to a relationship, whether it is decades or days old. Mindfulness can help each partner check in with their internal experience and communicate that experience more effectively to the other.  Being a mindful partner can potentially rewire long-standing unhelpful patterns of communication while enhancing compassion and promoting authenticity in that relationship.

For instance, let’s meet our mindful couple, Archie and Veronica. Archie’s hot button is tone of voice. When he feels that Veronica’s tone is critical or harsh, he shuts down. When he does so, Veronica feels like Archie is ignoring her and she feels hurt and angry. She wants him to respond to her and thus, ramps up her efforts to communicate what she is saying. This cycle of communication is self-defeating. With time and practice, Archie and Veronica learn to check in with themselves in that moment that their buttons are pushed. They become familiar with the patterns of emotions, thoughts, body sensations, and behaviors that are triggered. And then, if they wish, they can communicate what is happening for each of them and discuss ways to more effectively manage the conflict.

Veronica learns that sometimes, when it’s too late and Archie has withdrawn, she can manage her distress on her own and revisit the topic with Archie when he is not overloaded. And Archie learns to assert his need to take a brief timeout when he is emotionally flooded so that he can better attend to what Veronica is saying. They both can now take responsibility for their part in a conflict because they feel safe being vulnerable.

Mindfulness is not rocket science. It simply involves consistent effort to attend to the full experience of the present moment. In a conflict with a loved one, it is tempting to get overwhelmed by one particular aspect of the experience, for instance, thinking. So, with Veronica, when Archie was shut down, she was swept away by the distressing (and incorrect) thought that “He doesn’t care about me. He doesn’t listen to me. How could I be so stupid to choose someone who doesn’t want to listen to my needs?” Rather than checking in with other aspects of the experience (for instance her body sensations) and attempting to soothe herself until that distress could pass and more logical thinking could return.

It takes time, practice and patience to rewire old patterns of thinking and reacting. Luckily, our fantastically plastic brains have the indelible capacity to form new connections which result in new beliefs and behaviors. As this excellent blogpost describes, better connecting with yourself via mindfulness can have a transformative effect on the relationships in your life. The relationship we have with our partner is one of the relationships that most impacts our daily lives and thus, I believe that it’s one that deserves consistent care and attention.

(Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net)